Rock on!

Rock Cycle:  The Hard Truth

Today’s science lesson was all about rocks!  After briefly reviewing the different layers of the Earth, students learned all about the Rock Cycle and the three main categories of rocks (sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic).  We discussed how all the rocks on the earth are constantly changing due to weathering and changes in pressure and temperature.  By examining and identifying samples of different rock types, the students developed a greater understanding for how each rock type is formed.  They also learned the differences between minerals and rocks.

 

Additional Information:

This YouTube video offers a fun review of the three rock types. It’ll make you hungry to learn about rocks! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pg_jKJFbA2A

Questions:

Explain how granite (a igneous rock) can be turned into gneiss ( a metamorphic rock).

How do sedimentary rocks form?

 

El ciclo de las rocas, una dura realidad

En la clase de ciencias del día de hoy hablamos sobre las rocas. Primero hablamos sobre las distintas capas de la Tierra, y luego aprendimos sobre el ciclo de las rocas y sobre las tres categorías de rocas que existen (sedimentarias, ígneas y metamórficas). Discutimos cómo las rocas en la Tierra están en constante cambio debido a la erosión y a los cambios de presión y temperatura. Los estudiantes lograron comprender cómo se forman los distintos tipos de roca gracias a que examinaron y identificaron diversas muestras de rocas. Los alumnos también aprendieron sobre las diferencias entre los minerales y las rocas.

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Información adicional:

Este video de YouTube ofrece una entretenida revisión sobre los tres tipos de rocas. Te motivará a aprender más sobre las rocas:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pg_jKJFbA2A

Preguntas:

Explica cómo el granito (una roca del tipo ígnea) puede ser transformado a gneis (una roca del tipo metamórfico)

¿Cómo se forman las rocas sedimentarias?

 

Author

Dr. Maureen Griffin

Maureen earned a Ph.D. in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 2003. While at Penn, she developed a novel micro-mechanical technique called micropipette peeling to investigate the role of muscle cell adhesion in normal and diseased skeletal muscle cells. After graduating, Maureen worked full time as a post-doctoral researcher and then a staff scientist a SelectX Pharmaceuticals. She joined the teaching staff in 2008 and was excited to be made an executive staff member in 2009. Maureen also continued to consult part time for SelectX until her daughter's birth in 2009; now she is focused on Science from Scientists and, of course, her children. Maureen uses her spare time to read, blog, cook, and renovate her house.

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