Water, Water Everywhere

Water Cycle

Today, your students got to be water traveling through the earth’s water cycle! Using a simple game, students modeled how the water cycle works – we discovered that the real water cycle is more complicated that how its usually shown! Water can go through mini-cycles back and forth, traveling, for instance, from the atmosphere to the ocean and back to the atmosphere. Water can also become trapped for many years in the ocean, groundwater, or glaciers. This was a good model for the water cycle, but it doesn’t show everything. For instance, it does not show how much water is in every location.

We also noticed how no one was able to leave the room while acting as water molecules, and that is because water cannot leave the earth. All the water on the earth today is the same water that the dinosaurs drank! So it is important to take care of the water that is safe to drink, because we won’t get any more of it!

El ciclo del agua

El día de hoy, los estudiantes se convirtieron en “el agua” del “ciclo del agua” de la Tierra. Utilizando un simple juego, los estudiantes modelaron cómo funciona el ciclo del agua; y descubrimos que este ciclo es más complejo de cómo generalmente se enseña. El agua puede viajar de ida y de vuelta, en “mini ciclos, como, por ejemplo, cuando viaja de la atmósfera al océano y luego de vuelta a la atmósfera. El agua también puede quedarse “atrapada” por muchos años en el océano, en las aguas subterráneas o en los glaciares. El modelo del ciclo del agua que utilizamos es bueno, pero tiene algunas falencias, como que no nos muestra la cantidad de agua que hay en cada lugar.

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Author

Dr. Maureen Griffin

Maureen earned a Ph.D. in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 2003. While at Penn, she developed a novel micro-mechanical technique called micropipette peeling to investigate the role of muscle cell adhesion in normal and diseased skeletal muscle cells. After graduating, Maureen worked full time as a post-doctoral researcher and then a staff scientist a SelectX Pharmaceuticals. She joined the teaching staff in 2008 and was excited to be made an executive staff member in 2009. Maureen also continued to consult part time for SelectX until her daughter's birth in 2009; now she is focused on Science from Scientists and, of course, her children. Maureen uses her spare time to read, blog, cook, and renovate her house.

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